28 December 2015

Avoid trans-fatty acids

Trans-fatty acid, a type of fatty acid, comes from two main sources, namely, natural food and processed food. First, the natural source refers to the meat, fat and milk from ruminants such as cattle and sheep as well as their dairy output; second, a small amount of trans-fatty acid can be produced during hydrogenation, which occurs during refining and frying foods for long periods of time at high temperatures.

Based on decades of research, over-consumption of trans-fatty acid can increase the risk of cardio-vascular disease. Some research has also revealed that over-consumption of this could increase the risk of diabetes, posing a threat to a baby’s birth weight and leading to possible allergy and asthma problems.

Therefore, experts suggest that wafers, sandwiches, cream cakes and pie should not be eaten every day. But there is no overwhelming evidence to prove that trans-fatty acid is related to such diseases in early-stage growth of Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer.

Avoid trans-fatty acids

 Avoid trans-fatty acids


 Avoid trans-fatty acids


 Avoid trans-fatty acids


 Avoid trans-fatty acids